Spotlight on director Yvette Nolan for FANCY DANCER

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Yvette Nolan (Algonquin) is a playwright, dramaturg, and director. She's the editor of Beyond the Pale: Dramatic Writing from First Nations Writers and Writers of Colour. She was the president of the Playwrights Union of Canada (1998- 2001) and of Playwrights Canada Press (2003-2005), and was the National Arts Centre's Playwright-In-Residence (2007-2008). Yvette is currently the Artistic Director of Native Earth Performing Arts and Past President of the Indigenous Performing Arts Alliance. She was recently awarded the City of Toronto's Aboriginal Affairs Award.

Native Voices: You also attended the Origins Festival in London. How was your experience over there?
Yvette Nolan: London was great, and odd, and jarring. It was very strange to be welcomed to a land by the Maori people, whose land it is not. It was odd to not acknowledge the people whose traditional land it is, which is our practice up here in Canada, because we did not know who to thank. Celts? Saxons? Druids? It was strange to be in a country with so much green that is so - gardened. Wonderful green spaces, all beautifully manicured. So unlike my experience of land, of my land, which still bears the implication of wild. But doing theatre for those audiences was - well, it is a bit of a universal language, innit? Like theatregoers generally want to experience something through the art form, and so are open to the form. So that was great. One of my favourite moments was seeing one of the Origins festival volunteers in tears at the end of the performance - her fourth time in attendance.

NV: Native Earth Performing Arts is the oldest Aboriginal theatre company in Canada. What was the Native theatre "scene" like when Native Earth was founded?
YN: There was no Native theatre scene when Native Earth was founded, which is why the company was created. Jim Buller, the founder of the Association for Native Development of Performing Arts, produced what may be the first Native penned play in Canada, October Stranger, in 1977, adapted from his book Indians Don't Cry. He then founded the World Indigenous Theatre Festival in 1980, bringing together a bunch of Native artists, including Spiderwoman Theatre. Jim became the go-to guy for Native theatre, and when someone approached him to put together a production for the opening of a gallery, Jim directed them to Denis Lacroix, a Native actor, who roped in Bunny Sicard, and ta-dah! Native Earth was born. His work here done, Jim died, just as Native Earth was being born, in 1982. Bunny and Denis called together a bunch of Native artists who decided on the company's purpose and vision.

NV: Can you tell us a little about Native Earth?
YN: Native Earth was created as a place for Native artists to work together to create theatre. The vision is still to create, develop, and produce the professional artistic expression of the Aboriginal experience in Canada through theatre, dance and multi-disciplinary work, new script development, apprenticeships and internships. As the community has evolved, so has the company. We have more artists who have more formal training, or are trained in multiple disciplines. They have seen a body of work as they grew up, work by Native artists, and by artists from other cultural communities, and all that has inspired them. We are currently developing an opera in English, French and Algonquin, complete with a chorus of wolves, scientests, trees, and a 150-year heroine. The music is a combination of baroque and traditional. In a recent workshop, we had three Native singers. At the same time, we are still nurturing emerging writers who are writing about blood quantum, familial dysfunction, the apocalypse...

NV: What drew you to the profession of theatre?
YN: My parents, an Algonquin woman and an Irish immigrant, valued the arts inordinately, so they gave me books of art, piano and ballet lessons, drama classes, literature, from a very young age. I was a performer from a very young age, thought I wanted to be a ballet dancer, then an actor. I wanted to tell stories, and it is easier to tell stories as a playwright, as a director, as a producer. Voice was important to me very early, because both my parents came from silenced people, colonized people. Both came to English from another tongue - my father was the best Irish speaker in high school! - I have his award. My mother spoke Algonquin first, then French, then English.

NV: What is your earliest theatrical memory?
YN: Oh my, I don't remember the first one. I remember rounding up the neighbourhood kids and creating plays with them when I was seven. I remember doing the doll dance and the bee ballet when I was seven and eight years old at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet school. Man, I milked those for a good decade, because my mother never got tired of laughing at me sending myself up. "Do the bee ballet! Do the bee ballet!"

NV: If you could go back in time, which era would you visit?
YN: None. I don't want to go back. I only want to move forward. I don't really need to go back in time, because in my cosmology, all times exist now anyway. The ancestors are here with us, right?

NV: What's the longest standing item on your "To Do" list?
YN: Ooooooooooohh stop, it hurts.

NV: What is your greatest indulgence?
YN: I don't think of them as indulgences, I think of them as necessities. Chocolate, red wine, the New Yorker, boyfriends. Nachos. Maybe nachos.

NV: Fill in the blank: It's not theatre if it's not ___________.
YN: I don't know if I could ever say what theatre is not. I have seen theatre with no performers in it. I have seen theatre with no audience. I have seen theatre that did not change anyone in any way, and I guess for me theatre needs to be transformative. We need to be changed through the process of it, of doing it, of watching it, of participating in it. So for me, personally, its not theatre if it is not transformative. But that is a very personal thing.

NV: The 2009-2010 Season marks Native Voices' Tenth Anniversary at the Autry. Where do you think Native theatre will be in the next ten years?
YN: Oh my god. Visible. I hope we can be visible. On more stages, not just Native stages, but on other stages, being produced by other producers with resources.

For more information about Native Earth Performing Arts, please visit their website or their YouTube channel.

Here's a taste to whet your appetite:


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Spotlight on Randy Reinholz, Artistic Director of Native Voices at the Autry and Director of THE RED ROAD and CARBON BLACK

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Randy Reinholz (Choctaw) is the Artistic Director of Native Voices at the Autry; the Director of SDSU's School of Theatre, Television, and Film; and, this summer, he will be directing The Red Road and Carbon Black for our Playwrights Retreat and Festival of New Plays. He was recently honored with the Citation of Achievement from his alma mater (William Jewell College) for achieved distinction in theatre arts; it is the highest honor bestowed upon WJC alumni. Randy's also on the Board of Directors for TYA/USA, the Advisory Committee for the Native Theater Festival at the Public Theatre, and a member of The National Theatre Conference.
 
Native Voices: You just returned from the Origins Festival in London where Salvage received its international premiere. Can you share a favorite memory with us?
Randy Reinholz: What a great trip we had. The performers were wonderful. The designers made it so easy to load their work into the space. The crew at Riverside Studios was wonderful. Jean and Shelia prepared very well and Craig Wolf was outstanding at getting everything into the space ready for production. Salvage looked as good in London as it did in Los Angeles, except on a stage that was three times the size as the stage at the Autry. The reviews were strong, but none from the major papers yet. Diane Glancy's work holds up in many situations. She is a gifted writer.

Salvage playing in London meant so much to me personally. As a classically trained actor, the British theatre is something to aspire to. I feel like the cast and crew of Native Voices' production of Salvage looked as good as anything we saw while we were in London, which included six other plays, one of which featured Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart in Waiting for Godot.

Thanks to all the artists who made the show possible. Thanks to all the organizers, staff, crew and friends of Origins. It was an amazing festival.

NV: The first event Native Voices' hosted was a Festival of Native Plays fifteen years ago in Normal, Illinois and this year marks our sixth annual Playwrights Retreat. Can you reflect on the impact NV has had on Native writing and on the impact these festivals and retreats have had on NV?
RR: It is the stories - the stories are so moving, profound, metaphorical, and inspired. I am often physically tired when the work begins, but the power of the stories lifts me. I know these stories must be told, theatricalized in the highest terms, because at the heart of every tale is the search for healing - that is why the stories matter so much.

NV: Last year you were appointed Director of SDSU's School of Theatre, Television, and Film. How has it been managing your duties as Director with your responsibilities as Artistic Director of NV?
RR: Jean and Carlenne are inspiring partners in the work. Jean has so much experience and Carlenne the energy to make things better. I am blessed by these friends to carry the load and so lucky to have Jean's love.

NV: What drew you to the profession of theatre?
RR: The chance to tell stories, create worlds, and dream of a life that has more meaning than my family has ever known.

NV: What is your earliest theatrical memory?
RR: Seeing Snow White and the Seven Dwarves at the St. Louis Municipal Opera as a little boy. The next play I saw, I was in - The Miracle Worker, 1978.

NV: If you could go back in time, which era would you visit?
RR: I love now though I suppose pre-contact with the Choctaws or Irish would be interesting - maybe the 1300's.

NV: What's the longest standing item on your "To Do" list?
RR: Write a book called My Fathers about the men who have taught me what it means to be a man and an artist. Without these important men in my life, I might not have known how to live a creative life.

NV: What is your greatest indulgence?
RR: Wine - I love wine.

NV: Fill in the blank: It's not theatre if it's not ________.
RR: It's not theatre if it's not live and intimate.

NV: The 2009-2010 Season marks Native Voices' Tenth Anniversary at the Autry. Where do you think Native theatre will be in the next ten years?
RR: We will continue to refine our ability to use all aspects of theatre to connect all art forms and media to tell stories from multiple points of view to find the common truths that bind us together as a people. I look forward to the young leaders in our company taking control of the work and making art that astounds me and the audiences.

For more information about SDSU's School of Theatre, Television, and Film, please click here to visit their website.
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Spotlight on playwright Carolyn Dunn for THE FRYBREAD QUEEN

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Carolyn Dunn (Muskogee Creek, Seminole, Cherokee) is a poet, playwright and scholar whose poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. She's the founding director of the American Indian Theatre Collective and her play Ghost Dance is currently in development with the Los Angeles Theatre Project. She's also a songwriter and member of the all–women Native drum group The Mankillers.

The Frybread Queen centers around three generations of Indian women who have come together for the funeral of a beloved son. The collision of personalities forces them to confront long-simmering tensions that threaten to tear them apart. This play was developed at Native Voices' 2007 Playwrights Retreat and during NV's 2008 First Look Series.

Native Voices: Briefly describe your play.
Carolyn Dunn: Four women, four frybread recipes, one man. Let the beans fall where they may.

NV: What do you hope your play will elicit in an audience member?
CD: That we are all haunted by ghosts and those ghosts can be many things- including home and landscape.

NV: Since you began developing this play for our Playwrights Retreat, what has been revealed to you that you didn't know when you first submitted the play to Native Voices?
CD: That the story may belong to one character over the other. There may be four characters with equal stage time, but only one is the protagonist.

NV: What drew you to the profession of playwriting?
CD: The ability to tell stories on a spatial level, a level of scale that isn't always present in fiction. Writing plays can be very freeing, and very restrictive too but I like the intimacy of dialog and the challenge of creating sensory space on many levels.

NV: Which plays or playwrights have you been influenced by?
CD: Lorca, Sam Shepard, Maria Irena Fornes, Caryl Churchill.

NV: If you could go back in time, which era would you visit?
CD: I wouldn't go back in time. I like running water, electricity, and MAC cosmetics. I'm a Hollywood Indian. I can't help it.

NV: What's the longest standing item on your "To Do" list?
CD: Lose 70 lbs!!!

NV: What is your greatest indulgence?
CD: Well-made blue cheese dressing.

NV: Fill in the blank: It's not theatre if it's not ______.
CD: It's not theatre if it's not Belgium.

NV: As you may know, our 2009-2010 Season marks Native Voices' Tenth Anniversary at the Autry. Where do you think Native theatre will be in the next ten years?
CD: Still just out of mainstream theatre because the public isn't ready for Indians to be out of the frontier and out of the "west". We will still be where really cool things are happening, but only a handful of people will know about it.
 
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Spotlight on playwright Dawn Dumont for FANCY DANCER

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Dawn Dumont (Cree, Metis) hails from Alberta, Canada. She's written for television, radio, and the stage. Three of her plays: The Red Moon (Love Medicine) (2007), Visiting Elliot (2006), and The Trickster vs. Jesus Christ (2005) were produced by CBC Radio. In 2008, she was the head comedy writer for Celebrate: A National Aboriginal Day Special, that was broadcast on CBC Radio and her play, The Common Experience, is scheduled for a 2009 broadcast.

Fancy Dancer deals with the overlooked murders of thousands of Aboriginal women in Canada. The plays asks why society hasn't taken a stronger stance against these murders? How have the media and the police failed to respond? What effect of this lack of concern over their well-being does this have on Aboriginal women and their communities? Fancy Dancer was workshopped during Native Voices 2007 Playwrights Retreat and was featured at the 2007 Indigenous World Theatre Reading Series and the 2008 Two Worlds Native American Theater and Film Festival.

Native Voices: What do you hope your play will elicit in an audience member?
Dawn Dumont: Hope.

NV: Since you began developing this play for our 2009 Playwrights Retreat, what has been revealed to you that you didn't know when you first submitted the play to Native Voices?
DD: That I haven't allowed my most important character to speak.

NV: What drew you to the profession of playwriting?
DD: Dialogue. Actors. Wine-soaked conversations with other playwrights.

NV: Which plays or playwrights have you been influenced by?
DD: I'll give the Gov Palin answer: All of them.

NV: If you could go back in time, which era would you visit?
DD: When the dinosaurs walked the earth.

NV: What is your greatest indulgence?
Too many to list: massages? lattes? younger men?

NV: Fill in the blank: It's not theatre if it's not _______.
DD: It's not theatre if it's not transcendent (and one act too long...).

NV: As you may know, our 2009-2010 Season marks Native Voices' Tenth Anniversary at the Autry. Where do you think Native theatre will be in the next ten years?
DD: Tricky. The definition of what is Native Theatre will continue to shift towards the mainstream as Aboriginal writers continue to challenge the stereotypical ideas of what being Native is. That being said, I think theatre will become even more fun.
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Spotlight on playwright Terry Gomez for CARBON BLACK

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Welcome to our first of several spotlight posts centered around our retreat and festival participants. Taking a cue from American Theatre Magazine, we asked our participants to answer a series of ten questions meant to probe their minds about the process of new play development, their own lives as artists, and Native theatre in general. Some answered more candidly than others and all were very generous in taking the time to fill out our simple questionnaire. To them we say thank you and to you, our reader, we say welcome to Native Voices 2009 Playwrights Retreat and Festival of New Plays! Happy reading!

First up is Terry Gomez (Comanche), playwright for Carbon Black. Terry is a published and produced playwright, writer, director, actor, educator, and painter. She's directed for the Two Worlds Native Theater Festival and the Cool Side of Hell Theater Troupe, Institute of American Indian Arts and is a member of the planning committee for the Native Theater Festival at The Public Theater.

Her play, Carbon Black, is about a young boy (Carbon "Inky" Black) who's witnessed a horrific murder while sleeping on his balcony. With an agoraphobic mother to care for and a school system that's leaving him behind, Inky finds he has no one to turn to in his time of need.

Native Voices: Briefly describe your play.
Terry Gomez: Carbon Black is a story about the effects of violence on a family. In addition, even though our lives are touched and changed by violence; the media also plays a role in how the world is perceived and tries to gauge what is important and what isn't. The play examines fear and how it can control your life if you let it.

NV: What do you hope your play will elicit?
TG: That even though we go through traumatic events we can continue. The world can be a dangerous place but most people are good and want to help each other make it through.

NV: Since you began developing this play for our Playwrights Retreat, what has been revealed to you that you didn't know when you first submitted the play to Native Voices?
TG: I liked the suggestion that the television could become a character as well. I think it helped to clarify one of the scenes that I have been struggling with.

NV: What drew you to the profession of playwriting?
TG: We haven't been visible to the general public in regard to telling our own stories and histories as Native people. We are in every aspect of the work force yet I'm constantly meeting people who are surprised that Native people are still alive and live in the contemporary world. When we are recognized, we are usually contained and relegated to preconceived notions of what we're supposed to be. I am awed and humbled by our precious culture as individual nations and as a collective whole. Some elements of Native America should be shared with the world as a reminder that we are survivors and that we are here to stay. We should share this in our own words from our own points of view.

NV: Which plays or playwrights have you been influenced by?
TG: August Wilson. I am keen on the idea of a play for every decade. He wrote about the Black experience with a specific time frame in mind. I also like his writing style. As Native people we seem to be constantly changing but many of us are determined to hold on to our culture and traditions as well. I feel that I am recording some of these changes though my plays are fiction.

NV: If you could go back in time, which era would you visit?

TG: I don't know. The eighteen hundreds would be when we were living free and I would have liked to experience that even though there were many hardships. However, I also had such a beautiful great-grandfather and relatives, I wouldn't mind being a child again during the l960's and knowing this time to pay closer attention to them all. Those were very hard but happy times. I really miss my relatives. They all spoke their language fluently and...well. I have to stop, I'm getting too melancholy.

NV: What's the longest standing item on your "To Do" list?
TG: I have several new plays that I need to start. I can already hear some of my characters speaking and need to get to it.

NV: What is your greatest indulgence?
TG: Reading what I want to. Spending time with my family.

NV: As you may know, our 2009-2010 Season marks Native Voices' Tenth Anniversary at the Autry. Where do you think Native theatre will be in the next ten years?
TG: I'm hoping that we will have more Native theater companies, plays, and stories. I hope that we can form an even greater network to where we can pass the work around the globe so that a playwright can be heard in many different venues and their words shared with many different cultures. I know we are starting to see the beginning of this. If Indigenous nations and colleges could see (and some have) how this is a device for letting all Native voices be heard they would find that they have a powerful tool within their grasp and encourage Native theater to be present in our colleges which could keep Native playwrights coming forth. By having my voice heard, I feel competent in helping others who have important things to say about and for our Native culture. There is a freedom you receive when you know that someone is listening and that your thoughts and voice are validated.
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Announcing our 2009 Retreat and Festival Participants

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The time has come to officially announce our full roster of retreat and festival participants! Again, the 2009 Playwrights Retreat and Festival of New Plays will feature three new works, one radio adaptation, and our newly commissioned play for young audiences.

2009 Retreat and Festival Participants
Native Voices Staff
Producing Artistic Director: Randy Reinholz (Choctaw)
Producing Executive Director: Jean Bruce Scott
Managing Director: David Burton
Senior Manager: Rich Deely
Literary Manager: Carlenne Lacosta

Retreat Staff
On-site Host: Carlenne Lacosta
Stage Managers: Joan Marie Hurwit, Crystal Mercado, Pamela Sevilla
Production Assistants: Jennifer Bobiwash (Ojibway), Jonathan Tsang
Writing Workshop Leaders: Robert Caisley, Scott Horstein, Patricia Loughrey

Carbon Black
Playwright: Terry Gomez (Comanche)
Director: Randy Reinholz (Choctaw)
Dramaturg: Douglas Langworthy
Directing Intern: Courtney Elkin Mohler (Santa Barbara Chumash)
Stage Manager: Pamela Sevilla
Cast: Tonantzin Carmelo (Tongva/Gabrielino, Mexica), Michael Drummond, Sheila Tousey (Menominee, Stockbridge Munsee), Stephan Wolfert

The Frybread Queen
Playwright: Carolyn Dunn (Muskogee Creek, Seminole, Cherokee)
Director: Scott Horstein
Dramaturg: Robert Caisley
Directing Intern: Jennifer Bobiwash (Ojibway)
Stage Manager: Joan Marie Hurwit
Cast: LaVonne Rae Andrews (Tlingit Raven Clan), Arigon Starr (Kickapoo- Creek), Kateri Walker (Saginaw Chippewa), Rayanna Zaragoza (Pima)

Fancy Dancer
Playwright: Dawn Dumont (Cree, Metis)
Director: Yvette Nolan (Algonquin)
Dramaturg: Shirley Fishman
Directing Intern: Kalani Queypo (Blackfeet, Hawaiian)
Stage Manager: Pamela Sevilla
Cast: Tonantzin Carmelo (Tongva/Gabrielino, Mexica), Elena Finney (Mescalero Apache, Tarascan), Kateri Walker (Saginaw Chippewa), Stephan Wolfert

The Red Road
Playwright and Performer: Arigon Starr (Kickapoo- Creek)
Director: Randy Reinholz (Choctaw)
Dramaturg: Jean Bruce Scott
Stage Manager: Crystal Mercado

Different Doesn't Mean the Same
Playwright: Larissa FastHorse (Sicagnu Nation)
Composer: Adryan Russ
Puppet and Set Designer: G.W. "Skip" Mercier
Director: Dani Bedau
Dramaturg: Stephen McCormick
Stage Managers: Joan Marie Hurwit, Crystal Mercado
Cast: David Armstrong, Sofia Gardenswartz, Krysti Litt, Ian O'Meara

Check back here often for profiles on each of our participants and more behind-the-scenes info on Native Voices' summer programs. You may even see a post or two from our Senior Manager, Rich Deely. ;-D

Our schedule of events is posted below. Make sure to get in touch with us to make your reservations! We hope to see you at the theatre!
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This just in from London...

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Check out the comments someone left on Time Out London:

I was blown away by "Salvage". In fact, I've been blown away by all the plays in Origins! It's such a privilege to get an insight into the lives of people in cultures very different from our own. The most amazing thing about "Salvage" is that you keep being reminded that the play is set today - there are two young boys who live on the internet - but at the same time there's this incredible sense of the spiritual tradition in the character of the father, who is played by an amazing actor called Robert Greygrass. It's as if the characters are living in two worlds at the same time. You've just got to see it!

I've been loving this Festival. From the moment the Maori started to sing at the Scoop on Bank Holiday Monday, I knew we were in for something special. Strange Resting Places was an amazing play, and I also really loved the film Tkaronto. There are two plays running this week at Riverside Studios - Salvage and Windmill Baby - and they are both really brilliant, in very different ways! They've also got the famous filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin here: her film Kanehsatake is at the British Museum on Thursday, and she's speaking at Riverside on Friday. There's so much in this programme! (And, by the way, the programme book is brilliant too!)

Thanks so much for your comments Nisha! I wish I was there!
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In Conversation with Sheila Tousey for SALVAGE

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Salvage, by Diane Glancy, opens tomorrow, May 12, 2009 at Riverside Studios, London.

For interviews with the cast, please visit Autry Vision and enter "SALVAGE" in the search engine.
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In Conversation with Diane Glancy for SALVAGE

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SALVAGE opens on May 12th at Riverside Studios, London for the UK's Origins Festival featuring the best of Native theatre.
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We made it to Broadway (world.com)!

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Gearing up for one HOT summer!

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Still flying high off our success from Joy Harjo's Wings of Night Sky, Wings of Morning Light, Native Voices has devised a summer's worth of hot programs you won't want to miss!

First up is the international premiere of Diane Glancy's Salvage at the Origins Festival in London, England.

From the Origins' Press Release:
Origins is the UK’s festival of First Nations Creative Art. Groundbreaking artists from the indigenous cultures of Australia, Canada, New Zealand and USA are brought together in London by intercultural, multi-media company Border Crossings. The festival explores First Nations experience in the twenty-first century through theatre, film screenings, events and participation at venues across London.

Native Voices is proud is represent the USA in this inaugural festival celebrating the best of Native theatre. Executive Director Jean Bruce Scott landed in England a few days ago and she'll be joined shortly by Artistic Director Randy Reinholz, playwright Diane Glancy, director Sheila Tousey, the original cast from the LA production (Elena Finney, Robert Greygrass-Owens, and Noah Watts), and original Lighting Designer Craig Wolf who'll be filling in as Stage Manager.

The festival began yesterday with a Maori welcome ceremony and concludes on May 17th. Salvage opens next week on May 12th and runs until the conclusion of the festival. In addition, Randy and Diane will participate in several panels exploring Native identity as well as Native theatre.

If you happen to find yourself in the London area, be sure to stop by Riverside Studios for what's sure to be an awe-inspiring experience.

June sees the return of our Young Native Voices Theatre Education Project. Along with the Southern California Indian Center, NV will host acting and playwrighting workshops for Native American youth throughout the summer. Workshops will take place at the Autry National Center and SCIC with a culminating event taking place on Saturday, August 1st as part of SCIC's Annual Pow Wow at the Autry.

Scholarships are available; no prior experience is required. For more information, please email us. Applications are due on May 22nd.

While our YNV mentors keep things under control in LA, the rest of NV's staff will take up residence in San Diego for our sixth annual Playwrights Retreat and Festival of New Plays. This year's retreat will take place at San Diego State University from Sunday, June 14th - Sunday, June 21st with public readings to be held at the critically-acclaimed La Jolla Playhouse on Friday, June 19th and Saturday, June 20th. LA audiences need not fret as encore readings of all of the retreat plays will be held at the Autry on Friday, June 26th and Saturday, June 27th.

This year's retreat plays include: Carbon Black by Terry Gomez, The Frybread Queen by Carolyn Dunn, and Fancy Dancer by Dawn Dumont. The retreat will also feature a special performance of the radio adaption of The Red Road by Arigon Starr as well as a presentation of our newly commissioned TYA (Theatre for Young Audiences) piece, Different Doesn't Mean the Same by Larissa FastHorse, Adryan Russ, and G.W. "Skip" Mercier.

Check back here for more information regarding the retreat or email me if your question just can't wait (who knows, you just may inspire our next blog post).

In July, NV takes The Red Road to Lincoln, Nebraska for its radio recording before a live studio audience. Directed by legendary Dirk Maggs, this project is a part of the Native Radio Theater Project, a collaboration between Native Voices and Native American Public Telecommunications. In August, NV continues its work in radio with the production of Raven’s Radio Hour, by Jack Dalton and Ed Bourgeois, in Anchorage, Alaska. Both plays will be streaming on-line at www.airos.org this fall.

And then there's NV's fall schedule of events! The 2009-2010 Season marks Native Voices' Tenth Anniversary at the Autry National Center and you can be sure we're not going to let that pass quietly! But you'll have to wait a bit longer to hear about what we've got planned (I have to leave you wanting a little bit more right?).

To ensure you're receiving the latest NV news, sign up to follow our blog (check out the options to your right), join our mailing list, become a fan on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, visit us on Myspace, or stop by our website. Whatever you chose, just make sure we see you at the theatre!
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